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It is absolutely paralyzing to learn that your child has substance abuse issues. Where do you turn for help? How do you know what steps to take? What is addiction, anyway? There are endless questions and no consolidation source of answers or support. In addition, the stigma of having an addicted child causes many parents to retract and withdraw rather than seek help. In truth, many families struggle with substance abuse issues, and the support, wisdom and guidance they need are not easily found.Parent Pathway was created for parents, by parents, to provide a place to find peace of mind at a time when their world feels like it is falling apart.

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  • The Destructive Power of FEAR

    Momentarily FraughtFear had become the Higher Power in my life while my sons’ addiction progressed. Oxycontin was a force, a power of its own, over them; and I was taken hostage by fear. Shut down completely to a reactionary mode, I was in constant mind chatter. Fearful they would get hurt, fearing the phone calls, the police, and the incarceration. Fear became the source that ruled my life. Fearful of change at work, of making a mistake or wrong decision, my behavior turned to panic driven reactions! I would be irrational, angry or wishy-washy. If someone were to look into my life like reality TV, they would quickly assess: Kids have issues with drugs, what’s the matter with the mother?

    My program of recovery through Al-Anon is a spiritual one that offers a solution for living in constant fear. I have tools that help me discern if my thoughts are about things I am powerless over. I seek the help from my Higher Power rather than battle it on my own. I am presented with options that are calm, rational, secure and serene. I am powerless over the fearful feelings, but I’m not helpless.

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  • Sunday Inspiration for Parents of Addicts and Alcoholics

    Finding SerenitySome of us think holding on makes us strong; but sometimes it is letting go.

    - Hermann Hesse

     

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  • The Power of Denial – How taking action can begin the process of taking charge

    Denial is a very powerful thing. Often as outsiders to another families situation it seems so clear, ‘why don’t they see their kid is on drugs and do something?’, ‘why don’t they know that their kid is doing bad things in the neighborhood?’, ‘why don’t they….’ The list could go on and on. Denial keeps us from feeling and dealing with a pain that can be so severe it is debilitating. I know how this works because I went through it when my daughter struggled with serious substance abuse and addiction. Saying out loud what was actually happening meant it was real and if it was real then the consequences of what that truly meant were frightening.
    Yet crossing from denial to openly seeing what is truly happening right in front of us begins the process of taking charge. While it is challenging, it is better than letting the house burn down while we sit on the porch and think it’s a bit hot, but it’ll cool down soon. It’s an analogy that may seem extreme but works well. Denial keeps you from taking action to correct the situation. Sometimes denial is a way to cope until we have the strength or resources to take action. I’ve seen people be in denial for long periods of time and I know that it is not my place to judge. No one can tell each of us how to handle something, only we can determine what’s best for ourselves and our families. What we need to realize is that when we are in denial of a teenager who has a serious issue with drugs or alcohol, we may delay getting them the help they need to keep them safe. It is important to look at things with eyes wide open. Get help from family, friends and professionals. I know when I began to take action and get out of denial I then truly began to get help for my daughter.

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