Search Results for: outpatient

Does outpatient rehab work?

Some people do find success in outpatient drug rehab, but the odds are lower than if they had checked into a residential program. Research shows that the “gold standard” for sustained recovery is 90 days in an inpatient facility.

Teen addiction and treatment; what’s that look like?

teenage boy contemplatingThis is a guest post by Jeremy Stanton, owner and CEO of Haven House Addiction Treatment in West Los Angeles

Alcoholism and drug addiction can look wildly different when comparing a teenager with an adult. The differences between these two groups of addicts necessitate treatment plans that focus on characteristics particular to each group. A serious point of emphasis in the recovery of one addict may not always be applicable to another. While the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous and its accompanying shift in action and thinking are relevant to everyone regardless of age, teenagers struggling with substance abuse have a specific set of issues that need to be addressed and resolved.

The consequences of drug abuse that teens face are very different from adults. There are no homes to lose, marriages to dissolve or careers to implode. Simply put, teen addicts have less responsibilities to forego and fewer achievements to tarnish. Addicts and alcoholics can be notoriously shortsighted, and in the case of teenagers, parents’ primary concerns involve their child’s future. This raises serious concerns about how to address drug abuse with younger addicts. Focusing on immediate consequences can be a more fruitful approach than stressing the potential for their decisions to affect them in the future. Poor performance in school, loss of interest in hobbies and dangerous risk-taking behavior are all relevant and important aspects of addiction that will be immediately noticeable. For teens, there is no baseline with which to compare their current behavior. The adult addict is able to reflect upon the progressive nature of his or her illness and acknowledge its increasing severity. Parents should instead focus on how their child’s addiction has affected their priorities and interests and has had some form of immediate consequence. Remember that treating addiction is only effective when an addict self-diagnoses and admits to their illness; always show rather than tell how drugs and alcohol have impacted their life.

Sobriety can be a frightening experience for anyone, regardless of their age, for plenty of reasons. Younger addicts may associate abstinence from drugs and alcohol with a lack of social life or an inability to have fun. At such a young age, fears of being shut out by their peers can also prevent teenagers from expressing the willingness to seek sobriety. Much of a teenager’s identity revolves around their social and groups and friends. While experimentation is common for this age group, there is a difference between recreational and dangerous abuse of drugs and alcohol. This distinction can be difficult to notice, especially for those who have had little to no history using illegal substances. As teenagers continue to use drugs, they may not be able to see addictive patterns. Fortunately for younger individuals requiring help in overcoming addiction, there are many AA and NA groups across the country that focus on recovery in teenage populations. Having someone who is a similar age recount their own struggles with drugs and alcohol is a big deal for an individual who is conflicted about their own desire to get sober. No amount of parental concern, school suspensions, trips to jail or other consequences will have the impact of one addict speaking with another.

There are several other issues involved in helping teens in recovery that should also be acknowledged. Teenagers will often have a sense of invincibility about some of their behaviors and decisions, and substance use is no exception. Denial is especially powerful in younger populations. Even when they have a sense of self-awareness about their substance abuse, procrastination can also make it difficult to seek recovery. Younger people often feel that there will be plenty of time in the future to address things, even issues as serious as addiction. A large part of treatment involves education and scientific evidence. Misconceptions and misinformation, usually related by friends, contribute a lot to someone using drugs for the first time. Without using traditional scare-tactics, parents or other people in the addict’s support system can have an open and honest conversation about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse as well as the progression of addictive behaviors. Teens may fear punishment or blame from parents which can prevent them from admitting to their problems with drugs and alcohol.

Teenagers need a caring and supportive environment in order to recover from addiction. Sobriety is a difficult journey to walk, as anyone with the experience will tell you, and may seem even more frightening to a teenager. Anyone who can be honest with themselves is capable of recovery, and countless teenagers across the world can tell you that addiction is a strong, but defeatable opponent.

Jeremy Stanton is the owner and CEO of Haven House Addiction Treatment, a recovery community offering Detox, Outpatient, Inpatient and Continuing Care services for all ages located in West Los Angeles. For more information visit http://www.havenhouseaddictiontreatment.com or call (424) 293-2259.

Ask the Expert: How do I help or learn how to trust my son?

teenage alchoholismMy son is 17 years old. He started smoking marijuana at 13. This just got worse and worse. In March of this year he was arrested. He was seen snorting suboxone up his nose and taking a hit of synthetic marijuana. He went to juvenile detention center for 6 days and then to inpatient rehab for 45 days. He came home in May and finished school, got his diploma. He was taking masonry in a vo-tech school, he graduated from there and got a job right out of school. He was going to outpatient sessions, and NA meetings. A few weeks ago he broke his arm and was out of work. This is when the suspicious behavior started again. I found marijuana and suboxone in his wallet last weekend and I turned him in to his probation officer. We are all at a loss of what to do for him.. So now he is going to be on strict house arrest for up to 6 months, and he will no longer be allowed to drive to work or his meetings. He also has to attend a meeting every day. Please help me with some advice on what to do. He will be 18 in August, but that isn’t going to matter since probation has now placed him on house arrest. I just want my son back, but I don’t know how else to help him or how to trust him.

Photo of Christy CrandellEXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL: “It sounds like your son  needs a more intensive outpatient program to help him with his ongoing recovery. Does his probation officer work with any local treatment programs in the area that they can recommend or even perhaps help pay for? The recovery process is oftentimes a bumpy road and a very frustrating and scary time for a parent. Find a local Al-Anon program in your area which will give you support as you try to love your son through this but at the same time allowing you to stay healthy yourself. Sometimes you have to try multiple meeting locations to find one that meets your needs. Remember, he has been smoking marijuana for four years and it is going to take him awhile to figure out how to live his life without it. People beat this every day – don’t lose hope!”

Christy Crandell, Co-Founder of Full Circle Treatment Center

Ask the Expert: My son’s relapses and legal issues make me lose hope. How do I get my son back?

QUESTION: My son is 17 years old. He started smoking marijuana at 13. This just got worse and worse. In March of this year he was arrested. He was seen snorting suboxone up his nose and taking a hit of synthetic marijuana. He went to juvenile detention center for 6 days and then to inpatient rehab for 45 days. He came home in May and finished school, got his diploma. He was taking masonry in a vo-tech school, he graduated from there and got a job right out of school. He was going to outpatient sessions, and NA meetings. A few weeks ago he broke his arm and was out of work. This is when the suspicious behavior started again. I found marijuana and suboxone in his wallet last weekend and I turned him in to his probation officer. We are all at a loss of what to do for him. I have read everything about recovery and relapse and what to do, but this is frustrating. So now he is going to be on strict house arrest for up to 6 months, and he will no longer be allowed to drive to work or his meetings. He also has to attend a meeting every day. Please help me with some advice on what to do. He will be 18 in August, but that isn’t going to matter since probation has now placed him on house arrest. I just want my son back, but I don’t know how else to help him or how to trust him.

Photo of Christy CrandellEXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL: “It sounds like your son just needs a more intensive outpatient program to help him with his ongoing recovery.  Does his probation officer work with any local treatment programs in the area that they can recommend or even perhaps help pay for?  The recovery process is oftentimes a bumpy road and a very frustrating and scary time for a parent. Find a local Al-Anon program in your area which will give you support as you try to love your son through this but at the same time allowing you to stay healthy yourself. Sometimes you have to try multiple meeting locations to find one that meets your needs.  Remember, he has been smoking marijuana for four years and it is going to take him awhile to figure out how to live his life without it.  People beat this every day – don’t lose hope!”

Treatment Options to Addiction

The devastating path to addiction begins when an individual tries an addictive substance for the first time. Over time, after continuous intake of the addictive substance, the individual looses the ability to choose whether or not to abuse the substance; this is known as substance addiction. Substance addiction is a traumatizing, complex brain illness characterized by an uncontrollable drug craving and a compulsive need to use drugs to function normally every day, despite the consequences. With more than 22 million people in the U.S. abusing addictive substances, only 2.6 million people actually receive the addiction treatments they need. That leaves 19.4 million people vulnerable for the catastrophic results of substance addiction.

No single addiction treatment works for everyone, but various effective treatment options are available that attend to an individual’s substance addiction, as well as other needs of the individual. Such treatments include:

1. Standard treatment programs:
• provide educational and therapy sessions generally focused on getting/staying sober and preventing relapse
• may include family and group sessions
• depending on the individual’s level of addiction, these programs may include residential or outpatient settings
2. Self-help groups:
• Patients can meet other individuals with the same or similar problems which often helps increase motivation
3. Counseling/Psychotherapy:
• One-on-one therapy sessions with a specialist
• Family therapy sessions with a specialist: provide higher chances of a positive outcome by having a strong support system
• Discussing topics such as coping with cravings, avoiding the substance and relapse, and dealing with possible relapses
• Counseling may also incorporate discussions about legal problems, relationships with family and/or friends, work, school and more
4. Withdrawal therapy:
• Detoxification: stop taking the addictive substance as quickly as possible
• Withdrawal therapy may involve gradually reducing the dose of the drug or temporarily substituting the substance with other substances that have less serious side effects
• May include inpatient or outpatient residential settings
5. Behavioral therapy:
• Gives patients the opportunity to change their attitudes and behaviors that relate to their substance abuse
• Helps patients further engage in their treatment process by recognizing situations in which they are most likely to abuse the addictive substance, and how to avoid and cope with those situations
• Addresses the variety of influences on their substance abuse
• Motivational incentives are used for positive reinforcement to promote abstinence from addictive substances
6. Medications:
• used to help restore normal brain function, prevent relapse and eliminate cravings for an addictive substance
• For example, methadone and buprenorphine are used to act on the same part of the brain that opiates such as heroin and morphine effect, in order to minimize withdrawal symptoms and relieve cravings
• Other medications such as Naltrexone are also used to relieve cravings as well as the effects of the addictive substance

A Place of Hope’s Center for Counseling and Health Resources provides help for those who seek addiction treatments for alcohol addiction, illicit substance abuse addiction, prescription drug addiction or issues relating to gambling, sedatives, steroids and more. Dr. Gregory Jantz and his team of addiction medical professionals, psychologists, nutritionists and fitness trainers help to address the physical, psychological and spiritual problems that are behind the symptoms. Please visit us online at A Place Of Hope For Addiction or call us on 1-888-379-3372.

Ask the Expert: My son’s trouble with relapse and the law has me losing hope. How do I get my son back?

Question:  My son is 17 years old. He started smoking marijuana at 13. This just got worse and worse. In March of this year he was arrested. He was seen snorting suboxone up his nose and taking a hit of synthetic marijuana. He went to juvenile detention center for 6 days and then to inpatient rehab for 45 days. He came home in May and finished school, got his diploma. He was taking masonry in a vo-tech school, he graduated from there and got a job right out of school. He was going to outpatient sessions, and NA meetings. A few weeks ago he broke his arm and was out of work. This is when the suspicious behavior started again. I found marijuana and suboxone in his wallet last weekend and I turned him in to his probation officer. We are all at a loss of what to do for him. I have read everything about recovery and relapse and what to do, but this is frustrating. So now he is going to be on strict house arrest for up to 6 months, and he will no longer be allowed to drive to work or his meetings. He also has to attend a meeting every day. Please help me with some advice on what to do. He will be 18 in August, but that isn’t going to matter since probation has now placed him on house arrest. I just want my son back, but I don’t know how else to help him or how to trust him.

Photo of Christy CrandellEXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL: “It sounds like your son just needs a more intensive outpatient program to help him with his ongoing recovery.  Does his probation officer work with any local treatment programs in the area that they can recommend or even perhaps help pay for?  The recovery process is oftentimes a bumpy road and a very frustrating and scary time for a parent. Find a local Al-Anon program in your area which will give you support as you try to love your son through this but at the same time allowing you to stay healthy yourself. Sometimes you have to try multiple meeting locations to find one that meets your needs.  Remember, he has been smoking marijuana for four years and it is going to take him awhile to figure out how to live his life without it.  People beat this every day – don’t lose hope!”

 

Check out other questions from our readers and ideas from our experts here.

My son’s trouble with relapse and the law has me loosing hope. How do I get my son back?

My son is 17 years old. He started smoking marijuana at 13. This just got worse and worse. In March of this year he was arrested. He was seen snorting suboxone up his nose and taking a hit of synthetic marijuana. He went to juvenile detention center for 6 days and then to inpatient rehab for 45 days. He came home in May and finished school, got his diploma. He was taking masonry in a vo-tech school, he graduated from there and got a job right out of school. He was going to outpatient sessions, and NA meetings. A few weeks ago he broke his arm and was out of work. This is when the suspicious behavior started again. I found marijuana and suboxone in his wallet last weekend and I turned him in to his probation officer. We are all at a loss of what to do for him. I have read everything about recovery and relapse and what to do, but this is frustrating. So now he is going to be on strict house arrest for up to 6 months, and he will no longer be allowed to drive to work or his meetings. He also has to attend a meeting every day. Please help me with some advice on what to do. He will be 18 in August, but that isn’t going to matter since probation has now placed him on house arrest. I just want my son back, but I don’t know how else to help him or how to trust him.

Photo of Christy CrandellEXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL: “It sounds like your son just needs a more intensive outpatient program to help him with his ongoing recovery.  Does his probation officer work with any local treatment programs in the area that they can recommend or even perhaps help pay for?  The recovery process is oftentimes a bumpy road and a very frustrating and scary time for a parent. Find a local Al-Anon program in your area which will give you support as you try to love your son through this but at the same time allowing you to stay healthy yourself. Sometimes you have to try multiple meeting locations to find one that meets your needs.  Remember, he has been smoking marijuana for four years and it is going to take him awhile to figure out how to live his life without it.  People beat this every day – don’t lose hope!”

Ask the Expert: How do I Trust My Daughter After Detox?

My 21-year old daughter is a heroin addict. She just finished her detox at an inpatient facility. I find it very hard to trust her and let her go places alone in fear she will use. She says and has said she has no desire to start again. She is going to be starting an intensive outpatient program soon. How do I trust her and how do I support her? I believe she should have stayed in rehab at the inpatient facility or perhaps another one. She didn’t like the one she was at, and I don’t think this was handled the way it could have been in some circumstances.

Thank you,

Mom that is scared and a co-dependent

EXPERT KENT MORRISON:

There are several questions that need to be asked. First, why is she still not in an inpatient program? Did she leave against staff advice? Reason being is that it is always ideal to transfer from one program to the next, door to door, to keep continuity and motivation strong.

Second, rebuilding trust is a long process. As your daughter is 21, it is even more on her to earn back trust. With this there are several suggestions which are important. First, as she transitions into an outpatient program, there must be a family component to it to help educate and inform the entire family about addiction and recovery/sobriety. Helping the entire family will certainly be a positive step in healing the trust/relationship. Also, it will be important that your daughter seeks long term help. Heroin addiction (or any opiate/opioid addiction) is a difficult addiction to fight. There are compounding issues that contribute to why the addict’s use this type of drug and there are several critical components to recovery (such as diet, exercise, and mindfulness). It is even truer that we as professionals must treat the body, mind, and spirit of the addict. Finally, boundaries are going to be a helpful tool in rebuilding trust. Setting clear simple boundaries will help you see how your daughter is doing and seeing healthy behavior will provide visible signs of improvement.

- Kent Morrison, Substance Abuse Counselor, MA, LAADC-R, CADC II, ADCR

Photo of Christy CrandellEXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL:

It is wonderful she has taken this first important step in her recovery but recovery takes time. When she begins her outpatient program, make sure to inquire about family involvement. This is where you will learn about addiction and steps to take to rebuild your relationship. I would also recommend you attend Al-Anon or Nar-Anon meetings to find additional support for yourself.

– Christy Crandell, Administrative Director and Founder of Full Circle Treatment Center.

 

For resources to help you with the issue of trust, check out the “Trust Meeting in a Box.”

Finding the Right Rehab for your Addicted or Alcoholic Child

As a responsible parent, I sought out the right school for my kids, researched the right food for our healthy table, and found the right physicians for our family. But the right rehab?  Dr. Spock clearly omitted that critical chapter from his parenting books.  Where do I even begin with that due diligence under the pressure of an imploding family?

In shock, I was ill equipped to tackle the task at hand and didn’t even know what to look for.  Should I look for something local, or would it be better for my son to leave his local triggers behind? Did I even want him nearby or would it be better for all of us if he was far, far away? Should I seek a religious program or a 12-step program…and what is a 12-step program, anyway?  Residential or outpatient treatment?  Co-ed or not?  And how do I even know if a rehab is safe and good? And, by the way, how do we pay for rehab, and how long is it supposed to last, anyway?

Even if I could figure out what I was looking for, I didn’t know where to find it. After searching the internet and coming up dry, in desperation I called a spiritual store I had wandered into several months earlier.  The proprietor pointed me towards a rehab where my son began to build the foundation for his recovery.  I still think of that referral as a divine intervention.

With chemical dependency, there are more questions than answers.  I know that other parents continue to struggle with the fundamental question:  which rehab is right for my child?  I hope that readers of today’s blog will comment and share your insight about the rehab that you selected for your child.

How do I trust my daughter after detox?

My 21 yr. old daughter is a heroin addict. She just finished her detox at an inpatient facility. I find it very hard to trust her and let her go places alone in fear she will use. She says and has said she has no desire to start again. She is going to be starting an intensive outpatient program on the 16th of Nov. How do I trust her and how do I support her? I believe she should have stayed in rehab at the inpatient facility or perhaps another one. She didn’t like the one she was at, and I don’t think this was handled the way it could have been in some circumstances. Thank you, Mom that is scared and a co-de

EXPERT KENT MORRISON:

There are several questions that need to be asked. First, why is she still not in an inpatient program? Did she leave against staff advice? Reason being is that it is always ideal to transfer from one program to the next, door to door, to keep continuity and motivation strong.

Second, rebuilding trust is a long process. As your daughter is 21, it is even more on her to earn back trust. With this there are several suggestions which are important. First, as she transitions into an outpatient program, there must be a family component to it to help educate and inform the entire family about addiction and recovery/sobriety. Helping the entire family will certainly be a positive step in healing the trust/relationship. Also, it will be important that your daughter seeks long term help. Heroin addiction (or any opiate/opioid addiction) is a difficult addiction to fight. There are compounding issues that contribute to why the addict’s use this type of drug and there are several critical components to recovery (such as diet, exercise, and mindfulness). It is even truer that we as professionals must treat the body, mind, and spirit of the addict. Finally, boundaries are going to be a helpful tool in rebuilding trust. Setting clear simple boundaries will help you see how your daughter is doing and seeing healthy behavior will provide visible signs of improvement. - Kent Morrison, Substance Abuse Counselor, MA, LAADC-R, CADC II, ADCR

EXPERT CHRISTY CRANDELL:

It is wonderful she has taken this first important step in her recovery but recovery takes time. When she begins her outpatient program make sure to inquire about family involvement. This is where you will learn about addiction and steps to take to rebuild your relationship. I would also recommend you attend Al-Anon meetings to find additional support for yourself. – Christy Crandell, Administrative Director and Founder of Full Circle Treatment Center.